Who we are

We connect customers to opportunities

Unparalleled network

HSBC is one of the largest banking and financial services organisations in the world, with operations in 65 countries and territories. We aim to be where the growth is, enabling businesses to thrive and economies to prosper, and, ultimately, helping people to fulfil their hopes and realise their ambitions.

Our businesses

Our four global businesses serve more than 40 million customers worldwide. Our unparalleled international network links developed and emerging markets, and spans the world’s largest and fastest-growing trade corridors.

We have been connecting customers to opportunities since 1865

Fact: HSBC is present in 65 countries and territories, covering Europe, Asia, North and Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa.
Fact: HSBC has more than 40 million customers across its businesses.
Fact: HSBC has around 238,000 full-time equivalent employees worldwide.
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Leadership

Meet our Board of Directors and Senior management team.

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Our brand

The HSBC brand is recognised worldwide. Our latest advertising campaign highlights our role in helping people, businesses and communities to thrive.

Contact us

Whether you are a customer, investor, jobseeker or journalist, there are a number of ways for you to get in touch with us.

Our history

HSBC was established in 1865 to finance trade between Europe and Asia. The experiences of the past 150 years have helped form the bank’s character across the world.

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Our archives

Our archives reflect the bank’s long and eventful history. Find out what's in the collections and how to access them.

Building our foundations

Thomas Jackson helped drive HSBC’s early growth after it was founded in 1865.

News and insight

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The demographic divide

Ageing populations may force governments to raise retirement ages, says HSBC’s James Pomeroy.

My sabbatical story

HSBC’s Andy Russell took six months off work to travel, thanks to the bank’s sabbatical policy.

Keeping the global engine running

Slowing growth and low inflation mean central banks face tough decisions, says HSBC’s Janet Henry.