Dividend history and timetable

Dividends are declared in US dollars but can also be paid in UK pounds sterling, Hong Kong dollars, or a combination of these three currencies, at the shareholder’s request.

Below you can view the proposed timetable for the interim dividend for the 2021 half-year, together with historic dividend values and payments from 1997 to the present.

2021

Dividend Announcement Payment date Value per share Timetable
Interim for 1H21 02 Aug 2021 30 Sep 2021 US$0.07

(£0.051203)
(HK$0.545077)

Timetable information

  • 02 Aug 2021 Announcement
  • 19 Aug 2021 Shares quoted ex-dividend in London, Hong Kong, New York and Bermuda
  • 20 Aug 2021 Record date in London, Hong Kong, New York and Bermuda
  • 16 Sep 2021 Election deadline
  • 20 Sep 2021 Exchange rate determined for payment of dividends in sterling and Hong Kong dollars
  • 30 Sep 2021 Payment date
TOTAL*US$0.07

*Year-to-date dividend for the current year. Sterling and Hong Kong dollar equivalents for the current year will be shown when all translated dividend amounts for the year are available.


Note: Translated amounts are approximate.


For administrative questions relating to the payment of dividends, please contact the appropriate Registrars, ADR Depository or Paying Agent relating to your HSBC shareholding. Visit the Investor contacts page for details.

Dividend calculator

Use our dividend calculators to work out your dividend amount in US dollars, HK dollars and sterling

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